Odd Trousers That Every Man Needs

I don’t really know many men who wear odd trousers.

Most men have a wardrobe of suits and denim: the former is the anchor for the working week, the latter the weekend default. However, any moves to expand beyond this can often leave many stumped as to the most suitable options.

“What the hell is an odd trouser anyway?” you might ask.

Simply, odd means to stand alone. The theory of sartorial oddness is aligned with individuality. Odd jackets need to be worn on their own without appearing that they need to be worn with matching trousers. Very fine wool suit jackets, for example, are not suitable as they look as though they have been forcibly separated from their lower halves. Tweed suit jackets on the other hand don’t look out of place as they are naturally less formal and are therefore expected to be worn as separates – particularly when they are distinctly different to the colour and material of the trousers they are worn with.

Similarly, odd trousers require distinctive qualities and these qualities are best achieved through a combination of colour and texture.

Mid-grey flannel

Number one on any list of odd trousers, grey flannels were the uniform of the marvelous Fred Astaire. So connected was he to this material that Audrey Hepburn gave him a picture frame lined in the same grey flannel of his trousers.

A solid, mid or heavy weight is best. Grey flannels are very versatile and can be worn with casual corduroy and tweed jackets for countryside informality or navy hopsack blazers for a working week Friday ensemble.

Light grey

For spring and summer there is no better trouser than a light grey, lightweight wool. Again, the flexibility of grey’s beautiful neutrality means they can be worn with practically anything – and to anything. Worn with a silver grenadine tie, blue summer blazer and sockless tassel loafers for a slick, summer formal ensemble; or, with a white polo shirt and white plimsolls to a casual picnic. Wear slightly shorter, and tapered at the ankle.

Cream cotton drill

White trousers don’t sound like the most practical suggestion, but there are few better options when the occasion calls for crisp chicness. When the sun comes out, there are few more pleasurable things to wear than a cool pair of cream cotton drills; you feel at once sporty and elegant, slightly retro and yet also timeless. Wear with burgundy penny loafers, blue linen jackets, unlined summer blazers in grey and navy and cosy cricket jumpers for cool summer evenings.

Mid-grey large check

Everyone needs a pair of ‘wild’ trousers. The Victorians, before Queen Victoria’s mourning started the fashion for black, were noted for wearing nattily checked trousers, following the fashion for the writings of Sir Walter Scott and Scottish tartan – a trend which the Queen and her husband Albert had also led, due to their love affair with Scotland and acquisition of Balmoral. Tom Ford’s collections have recently revived this look and they are perfect for wearing to break the formality or stiffness of a look. Navy blazers and velvet jackets benefit the most from their playfulness.

Brown tweed

A single pair of odd tweed trousers goes a long way. Proper tweed is heavy and hard-wearing, but also elegant. Out of town, when wearing cashmere crew and v-neck sweaters, men utilize few options except denim and corduroy. And yet tweed has far more place on casual weekend jaunts to castles and tea rooms than a pair of jeans. Appropriate for both pub and drawing room, tweed is considerably more flexible, not to mention warmer and more comfortable. A rich brown tweed looks glorious next to smooth navy cashmere sweaters and cardigans, deep green wax jackets and burgundy brogues.

Country Weekends

One of my professional acquaintances recently told me over lunch they had taken my advice and secured a private country house for post-Christmas celebrations and New Year’s fireworks and champagne.

“We’ve taken a place up in Scotland. It’s a massive castle-y thing. Looks spectacular. Probably going to be freezing.”

For anyone curious enough, they had done so through Landmark Trust, which is one of the most splendid and useful causes in the land. With a powerful and unsurprisingly supportive royal patron in Prince Charles, the Trust is a unique blend of heritage preservation and hospitality. Imagine visiting a small stately home and wishing you could have it for the weekend only – without the maintenance, heating bills and crumbling roof – and that you could do so in style, with tasteful furniture of the period and not a flatscreen or wifi router in sight.

Having taking Landmark Trust holidays myself, I enthusiastically told my acquaintance of the gentleness of such an experience; an escape to nature, to an older time, to natural, log-lit warmth, board games and simple pleasures. If holidays are ultimately about escaping everyday life, then Landmarks are the most accurate example.

However, I digress.

My acquaintance had planned to take a few leaves from the book of country gentlemen and actually dress what he termed as ‘the part of squire.’

“I don’t want to be one of those awful Chelsea people who turn up in brand new Range Rovers with Moncler gilets and iPads.”

For him, such a weekend was an escape to the textured, layered, regimented routine of the past. There would be, he insisted, no gilets at the dinner table:

“I want people to wear tweed to breakfast, go on walks through the hills in shooting socks, dress for dinner.”

His guests, he insisted, would surely find the sojourn into a forgotten age fulfilling. It was a world away from BlackBerries, from childcare and the school run; from double-glazing, computers and management-speak.

“It’s like Downton Abbey I suppose!” he spluttered “and that’s why dressing is so important. How would you do it? I’d be fascinated to know…”

An Active Morning

One of the treats of staying in the countryside, particularly in a grand manor house on acres of grounds, is the great plethora of outdoor pursuits that could even be as simple as a “walk to the folly.” However, for such activities, the elements often get in the way. Waterproofing and layering is required when staying out in the cold for extended periods, and a hat is often useful to battle against harsh, cold winds. As such, combining a little formality (a tweed waistcoat) with a practical jacket (a waterproof waxed Barbour), with the addition of a scarlet silk scarf and a tweed flat cap is just the right combination of country elegance and sensible clothing. A pair of Wellington boots would complete the look.

Waxed jacket: Barbour
Tweed waistcoat: Ralph Lauren
Boots: Hunter
Silk scarf: Woods of Shropshire
Tweed cap: Lock & Co

A Gentle Afternoon

Although weekends in the country can be rather outdoorsy affairs with rain, mud, Wellington boots, wet dogs and reddened cheeks, there is always the promise of some refinement; a quiet card game by the fire, some 3pm champagne in the drawing room or reading by the gentle tick of the long-case clock in the hall. Therefore, a tweed jacket (houndstooth is ideal), a crisp white cotton shirt, a pair of grey flannel trousers and brown Oxford brogues would help to keep up the stately atmosphere.

Tweed jacket: Ralph Lauren
Houndstooth trousers: Gieves & Hawkes
Shoes: Meermin

A Refined Evening

Pretending to be the squire of some old castle is enormous fun, particularly when you dress up in evening gear in the accepted ‘code’ of a host. With black tie, whereas guests are expected to don formal evening jackets and shoes, hosts ‘at home’ have often chosen to wear a more relaxed velvet smoking jacket and velvet Albert slippers instead of shoes.

Green velvet jacket: Kingsman
Velvet slippers: Leffot

Instant Upgrades

“How do you make cheap clothing look expensive?” is one of the most common questions I am asked.

The belief is that there is some trick afoot, some skill through which you can conceal ‘cheapness.’ The truth is that cheapness can never be concealed; it can only be removed.

Similarly, expensive items can often look cheaper than they are when worn poorly, with little style or coordination.

The incorrect assumption in both situations is that all expensive things fit properly and look good and that all cheap things don’t fit and look bad.

I can’t count the number of times I have wandered down Savile Row from my office to get my lunch, bump into friends who work there and then watch them admire my inexpensive jackets from Zara or Massimo Dutti; “This is nice!” they say “Which tailor is this from?”

I believe that what people really mean by ‘cheapness’ and ‘expensiveness’ is actually tastelessness and tastefulness; the standards by which all anthropogenic things are judged.

‘Good taste’ is a nebulous concept, prized for its incorporation and representation of the quality of human thought. It has therefore no consistent relationship with expense. Tangerine silk suits and garish gold taps may be extremely expensive but look cheaper than materials available at a fraction of the price.

Suit fabrics

Texture and pattern are the most important considerations beyond the cut of the suit. Quality of finish is, of course, highly desirable but the best of it (Milanese buttonholes, hand sewn linings etc) come at a very high price.

Texture

Matte, flat texures are best; flannels and birdseyes. Weaved patterns are also good – think herringbone tweed and cavalry twill. Flannel is the easiest to find (Massimo Dutti, Uniqlo). Herringbone tweed is also widely available (J.Crew, Hackett).

Pattern

Subtle patterns are often better than plain colours, particularly in lighter shades; a Glen Urquhart (Prince of Wales) check is, I find, a more tasteful option than a plain light grey worsted or twill suit, which can look rather like a pair of Farah trousers. Similarly, a subtle stripe or check often works better than plain fabrics in darker charcoals, which can look too funereal.

Tweaks     

Tweaking RTW garments to make them unique is one of the best ways to improve them and eliminate any cheapness.

Buttons

Plastic buttons are easily replaced with shell or horn buttons. Though brands like J. Crew and Massimo Dutti now offer decent quality buttons, many high street brands still use poor quality stock. Natural is always better than man-made when it comes to button material.

Trousers

I think one of the best tweaks I have employed is with trousers; giving long trousers a healthy-sized turn-up and tapering them to the ankle whilst retaining the size in the thigh down to the knee. Even discount trousers from brands such as River Island and H&M.

Accessorize

It sounds so simple but accessorizing properly makes a huge difference to inexpensive garments.

Pocket squares

The nasty ‘pocket lining’ decorations they stuff into high-street blazer pockets should be discarded upon purchase. Instead, venture into the seasonal sales on Jermyn Street (e.g. TM Lewin, Fortnum & Mason) to pick up some fine silk twills. Alternatively, though a little more expensive, Augustus Hare and Drakes offer artistic pocket decorations that will liven up the most basic of garments.

Ties

Ties should not be ignored. Too many men spend large sums on suits and shoes and ignore the aesthetic of the tie. They buy shiny twills, not insignificant in price, but entirely lacking in artistry. Instead of splashing on garish, gilded neckwear in uncomfortably thick silk, go vintage and get on eBay. It requires patience but you can end up with some beautiful, and sadly neglected, neckwear.

The Sartorial Season: Henley Royal Regatta

Second in the series – after last year’s introduction to Royal Ascot – Henley is the most famous rowing regatta in the world.

It takes place in Henley-on-Thames, approximately 1 hour from central London on the banks of the same famous river that flows through the capital. The regatta was established shortly after Queen Victoria assumed the throne, in 1839: the year in which Belgium, as a kingdom, was officially created.

Taking place over five days at the beginning of July, the Royal Regatta is smack bang in the middle of the Season – and the middle of the summer. Despite Britain’s reputation for its euphemistically named ‘mild’ warmer season, this is still the time of the year most likely to experience temperatures above 80 degrees Farenheit. This has some bearing on Henley, as soaring Mercury is the greatest catalyst for Britons to adopt a state of undress.

As it was established long before rowing federations existed, Henley has its own rules and its own way of hosting rowing races. Each race is a knockout draw, with only two boats racing in each heat – a rather uneconomical and laborious process, but one which enables the consumption of Pimms to be prolonged.

In many ways, watching a series of rowing races is very much like watching a series of horse races and, like Royal Ascot, there are ‘enclosures’ for elite spectators; much in the same way that the Royal Enclosure at Ascot dictates the attire for fellow racegoers, the Stewards’ Enclosure sets the tone for the rest of the Regatta.

The dress code for the Stewards’ Enclosure states:

“Gentlemen are required to wear lounge suits, or jackets or blazers, with flannels, and a tie or cravat.”

Of all the qualifying garments, it is the blazer that recalls the spirit of Henley most vividly. Rowing teams all wear their team blazer whenever they are not out on the water. In many cases, this blazer has a very colourful striped pattern, with the rowing club crest emblazoned on the breast pocket. Many ex-rowers bounce along in rowing blazers too, as well as those who are members of rowing clubs, school and university affiliations or even private members clubs.

As such, it’s difficult not to feel left out if you aren’t wearing one; few are the times a man would yearn for a jacket he would never use on any other occasion. And general etiquette dictates that a man should not ‘adopt’ a club’s colours simply because he likes the pattern. For corroboration, you have only to ask the nearest Scotsman his opinion of non-Scots wearing tartan.

However, it is possible to ‘do Henley’ properly without resorting to wearing what the rowing fraternity are wearing.

Firstly, it should be clear that this is no occasion for City suits. Those dark grey wools, charcoal pinstripes, and natty Glen Plaids are not appropriate, even if they are accepted. This is an English summer sporting event in the countryside.

If you choose to go for a full suit, then summer fabrics should lead the way. A crisp linen (or wool-linen) suit in mid-blue, navy, caramel or creamy white would sit perfectly against the preponderance of three-button rowing blazers to continue the theme of charming, antiquated Edwardian design.

However, the easiest solution may be a simple navy hopsack blazer with patch pockets, worn with cream or light grey flannel trousers – a summer stroller, very much in the spirit of Henley.

To achieve the full inter-war Henley aesthetic, accessorise using a light blue shirt with a contrasting white club collar, a repp tie and a brass tie pin. Henley is no place for black shoes. Instead, wear Chestnut Oxfords or – even better – semi- or full brogues.

Should you be inclined to millinery, this is the ideal opportunity to wear a straw boater from Olney – pretty much the only serious boater you can find. They are made of proper, multi-ply Coburg straw rather than simple wheat straw. Those squeamish of skimmers might prefer a Panama.

 

Underrated Assets: Suit Texture

I’ll probably get ridiculed for saying this by die-hard classicists, but navy suits are vastly overrated.

Don’t get me wrong. I don’t dislike them. I will always feel obliged to own one; in certain situations, both professional and personal, nothing else will do.

But their proudest owners are so doggedly attached to them, so reluctant to wear anything else that they have begun to irritate me.

“They’re the smartest suits, and the most flattering” one acquaintance argued.

“Precisely” chimes another “you can wear any colour shirt or tie with them. They’re faultless.”

It’s true that navy is an excellent border for colourful shirts and ties. The darkness of the tone brings the brightness of other items to the fore.

But the real problem of navy suits is that the fabric always looks cheaper than it actually is. Particularly on a bright, sunny day.

I met some professional acquaintances recently on a warm, clement day in Mayfair. The women were strutting the streets in oversized white sunglasses; the Gulf-plated Rolls Royces had their roofs down, and were wafting through the streets like Rivas down the Grand Canal.

It was an idyllic day. However, it was also a working day and unfortunately, we were obliged to talk shop, so decided it might make it more bearable to lunch al fresco.

Both men were wearing navy suits in fine super wool and neither of them lost any time in telling me that they had them made at the same bespoke tailor. They were obviously well cut; the shoulders smooth and well-shaped, the waist sculpted and flattering.

However, aside from the cut, you couldn’t tell these suits cost in excess of £1000. In the bright sunshine, the smooth texture of the super wool reflected the light, making them look shiny. The navy, which in darker interiors and on a cloudy day was richly saturated, looked washed out and the fabrics – which were, they informed me, decent quality VBC – looked far cheaper than they actually were.

On the way back from the lunch, I walked past an elderly gentleman in a hopsack navy suit. The shoulders on his jacket were a little off, and he was about two chest sizes smaller than the garment, but somehow, the rougher texture married well with the bright sunshine. There was no shine, just a deep, matte blue.

In short, the super wools that proliferate and dominate the inventories of entry level online tailors aren’t as sophisticated as they sound. In fact, they can make a beautifully made suit look rather cheap. The fineness of the weave creates a smooth surface that is more reflective and under the harsh scrutiny of a midday sun is distractingly glossy.

There are two solutions I would advocate; wear a light grey sharkskin or Glen check – which look far superior when the sky is blue and the sun is high – or only purchase navy suits with a texture. A textured fabric also has the added benefit of utility; looking less like a suit orphan, it can be deployed as a blazer.