Micro Patterned Ties

Advertisement

micro-pattern-ties-1

The process of simplifying my wardrobe continues apace. So far I’m rather happy with the result. I have a core wardrobe with items that not only compliment me but one another.

One area that still requires a little development is that of my ties. Many moons ago I wrote a piece on how you could achieve an array of looks with as little as three ties and five shirts (see here).

I’ve followed my own advice and have supplemented this with knitted navy and black ties in wool as well as cotton and cashmere. The navy suit and black knit tie has become something of a uniform, but it suits me perfectly, both inside and out. Even if I do say so myself, I look clean, crisp, classic and uncluttered, ever so slightly of another era even.

This new look may be a little dull to some, but the devil is in the detail. The knit tie provides texture and a nice contrast to the worsted wool of my suits. It’s worth bearing in mind that texture can be a good substitute for colour, a helpful tip if you’re a little nervous when it comes to colour co-ordination. What is more, my simple tie selection allows me to add various shirt styles, colours and patterns without destroying ‘my look’. I should also add that I’ve managed to remove all the off the peg suits from my collection. Simple ensembles allow the suits to shine.

micro-pattern-ties-2

But no man can live by bread alone, so I’m looking to expand my tie collection, just slightly, while maintaining a clean classic adult aesthetic.  For this, micro pattern ties are a perfect addition. We’re talking puppy tooth (smaller than hounds tooth), micro dots, mini-checks and the like. I’m not a fan of merely laying blocks of pure colour next to each other and large pattern ties, including stripes, can dominate a look. Micro patterns, however, can provide visual texture and allow you to break up blocks of colour. They also possess a level of subtle sophistication which disguises their simplicity.


Advertisement

Andrew Williams blogs at BespokeMe and is based in London. His clothing label Bulldog & Wasp represents his philosophy that style is a frame of mind not just a state of dress.

Comments

  1. Classic styles should be supported by classic colours: don’t you agree?