Weekend Accessories

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I’ve been giving an indecent amount of thought to my accessories this week.

You may recall that I’ve already simplified my business wardrobe, and now I wish to do the same for weekend attire. I’m looking for some simple core looks with maximum flexibility. To that end layering will play an important part, which can dramatically alter the look of even the dullest kit. Of crucial importance, as in simplifying my business wardrobe, will be accessories.  And this has me contemplating what I call my weekend accessories.

grey-wool-ties

What the navy knitted silk tie is to business dress the grey wool tie is to casual kit. It seems to just about compliment anything, from jeans and a blazer to jean jacket, chinos and plaid shirt. The wool adds textural harmony to heavy rough clothes like denim or cord and a touch of contrast to worsted wool clothing such as a blazer. In terms of colour coordination, grey sits well with anything, patterned or plain. I think of a grey wool tie as a perfect binding item, which ties in all the items in one look.

w-cravats

I’m not sure why, but I’ve also been considering cravats (Ascots) lately. A dangerous bit of kit this if you’re under the age of 45. It can go horribly wrong in so many ways, either making you looking like a buffer aspirant or a pretentious ponce – says the man currently drinking a Sapphire Martini!

The key, and how I intend to play the game, is to hide as much of the cravat as possible, providing just the merest hint of silk and colour. To do this I’d sit it under a shirt with the collar buttoned to the top button but one and underneath a crewneck jumper. Worn in this discrete fashion you can get away with it dressed up or down – blazer and flannels or jacket and jeans. In my own case during the summer I tend to wear neckerchief and this is my winter weekend variation.

In my next post a few sources to consider for those all important accessories.


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Andrew Williams blogs at BespokeMe and is based in London. His clothing label Bulldog & Wasp represents his philosophy that style is a frame of mind not just a state of dress.

Comments

  1. Adam L. says:

    Oh, that cravat is dangerous… but so fun. I started out with two top buttons undone, but that proved to be a bit much. You’re right – just the top button. With that, it can even work in the warmer months, particularly in silk as a contrast to all the cotton and linen.

    Just be prepared, on a particularly raucous night at the local bar, to have some deliriously drunk idiot tug at it and try a funny (but slurred) remark. Only happened once, but still… or is that only a problem with drunks on my side of the pond?